Disaster Response

Hurricane Michael and Mutual Aid

Hurricane Michael has caused widespread damage and power outages in Florida, Georgia, Alabama, the Carolinas, and Virginia. The American Public Power Association's mutual aid network was activated before the storm and emergency power restoration crews and materials have been dispatched, as requested by affected entities. We are also working round the clock with the rest of the energy industry and our federal government partners to monitor the situation and organize help as needed.
 

From Public Power Daily

Oct 16: Tallahassee at 95 percent of power restoration

Oct 15: Florida restoration efforts make solid progress; Tallahassee at 90 percent restored

Oct 12: In the wake of Michael, public power makes restoration push

Oct 11: Public power crews start initial work on post-Michael restoration

Oct 9: Public power mutual aid efforts swing into action with Hurricane Michael
 

Storm Response & Resource Updates

Department of Energy situation reports

Florida Municipal Electric Association response update

ESCC press release: Electric power industry is coordinating Hurricane Michael response

Mutual aid resources for public power utilities

Public Power Ready: customer resources

FEMA resources and updates

Community Guidelines for Energy Emergencies
 

Mutual Aid

Mutual aid is electric utilities helping each other in times of need. The American Public Power Association, together with state and regional public power utilities and organizations, coordinates the mutual aid network for the nation’s public power utilities. Utilities that want to give and get help for power restoration after a disaster sign up for this network. When (and even before) a major disaster hits a utility’s territory and the utility knows that its own crews and equipment won’t be enough to restore power quickly, it calls for mutual aid. It provides its best estimate of how many people it needs and what type of skills they should have. The utility also specifies equipment and material needs. Other utilities in the network respond with what they can offer. The actual dispatch and movement of crews from different utilities is coordinated by utility and public power association personnel who volunteer as regional and national mutual aid coordinators. Learn more about mutual aid in this fact sheet.
 

Restoring Power After an Outage

https://www.publicpower.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/34%20How%20Do%20Outages%20Happen.jpghttps://www.publicpower.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/34%20How%20Do%20Outages%20Happen.jpghttps://www.publicpower.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/34%20How%20Do%20Outages%20Happen.jpghttps://www.publicpower.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/34%20How%20Do%20Outages%20Happen.jpghttps://www.publicpower.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/34%20How%20Do%20Outages%20Happen.jpghttps://www.publicpower.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/34%20How%20Do%20Outages%20Happen.jpghttps://www.publicpower.org/sites/default/files/inline-images/34%20How%20Do%20Outages%20Happen.jpg


From Social Media